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Tips To Stay True To Your Reading Resolution

So you’ve made a resolution to read more books. Even if it isn’t New Year’s Eve you will certainly find yourself to be sharing this resolution with countless other people all over the world. And whether this is day 1 or day 100 you’ll realise that keeping up with your reading resolution is far easier said than done.
 
As an avid reader I’m here to help you out by giving you 5 easy tips that you can follow to keep up with your reading resolution.

Read what you want to read

If you’re a new reader the worst thing you can do is pick up a classic novel or a book on business management just because someone told to. I don’t mean to say that you won’t be able to read such books but you might just get bored of it much more quickly because you’re reading it on someone else’s recommendation who only told you to read it because  it is the ‘sophisticated’ choice.
Ask yourself what you really want to read about and then pick up a book that corresponds with what you wish to read. In the book community we never discriminate readers based on their choice of books.

10 Minutes at a time

Whenever you find some free time on your hands you’re likely to gravitate towards your twitter app or the new season of Stranger Things. Every time this happens tell yourself that you’ll pick up your gadgets later. Force yourself to read something for just 10 minutes before doing anything else. It is likely that in those 10 minutes you’ll get engrossed in your book and will continue reading along. And even if that doesn’t happen, at least you clocked in 10 minutes.

No need to keep an hourly goal

Most people will keep a daily goal of an hour of reading. And as is the case with every goal they’ll start slacking. They might just get in half an hour of reading one day and 10 minutes the other. Then their treacherous brain will say what is the point if I can’t read for an hour every day? Let me just abandon this resolution. 
It’s important to remember the saying ‘every drop counts’. It’s okay if you get in less reading time some days and none on others. That doesn’t mean you should give up. Take it from me, even the most voracious readers may not get the time to read every single day and that’s okay. What matters is your progress, not the ups and downs during the process.

Try audiobooks

If you’re a person who just gets stuck staring at a single page for hours and hours without getting anywhere or someone who after working long hours staring at a computer screen can’t bare to read a single word, you should try out audiobooks. Some people find it easier to listen to stories than read them, especially when they have control on the speed of the narrator and can find good quality audiobooks with background sounds and different narrators. At that point it’s almost like you’re listening to a movie.

Reward yourself

This goes for any goal or resolution – reward yourself!
If you’ve finished reading a book and find out it has a movie or show adaptation then treat yourself and go watch it. It’s up to yo to find different reward systems and find out which one works for you. The key here is not to overdo it to the point that you’re rewarding yourself more than you’re making progress with your reading.

If you can follow all these tips I’m pretty confident that you’ll be flying through books in no time! But remember to always enjoy the experience and the story of each and every book. Good luck!

Charvi Koul

Charvi is an introverted book blogger with a flair for writing and unending love for fictional characters. She is a huge psychology enthusiast and loves to paint or go out for a swim. You will usually find her day dreaming about books, plotting stories in her head, blogging away or trying to escape certain death by her stack of unread books.

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How To Find Time For Reading In The Binge Culture?

Ask anyone whether they would prefer to binge watch a new show or read a book and almost everyone will go with the former. Even avid readers can get lost in the world of binge-watching and end up abandoning their books. In today’s hectic life it is difficult to carve out some me time and even during that little time most people gravitate towards watching something than reading, partly because of the fact that when others are talking about the latest season of Stranger Things they feel left out and partly because watching something can be less taxing on the mind than reading a book.
 
Nevertheless one shouldn’t abandon their reading and if you are one of those people who recognise this and want to actively work towards increasing your reading time, here’s what you can do. Whenever you feel like watching a show tell yourself you’ll click that play button after you’ve read your book for 10 minutes. Sometimes you get so engrossed into the book you’ll forget wanting to watch that show at all! And even if you don’t at least you got in those 10 minutes of reading. Every little bit counts. 
And let’s be honest here, verry few of us have an unlimited data or wifi to binge watch all those shows. Why not save those MBs and GBs and go read for a while? 
 
Another great tip is to read the book before you watch the movie or show. These days so many book to movie or show adaptations are coming up and becoming popular that it’s impossible to avoid them! Pick a show and look up the book it has been adapted from and go read it first. That way not only will you be able to watch the show but also get some reading done. There’s also the fact that reading the book before binge-watching will give you more of an insight into the themes and characters and you will be less confused and excited to see the characters you had read about play out on the screen.
 
Don’t feel guilty of binge-watching, it’s okay to do that every once in a while. Both reading and binge watching can go hand in hand if you are clever and resourceful. You can read a book while commuting to work or school or college and then binge watch on the weekends. Just remember to maintain this healthy balance in your life!

Charvi Koul

Charvi is an introverted book blogger with a flair for writing and unending love for fictional characters. She is a huge psychology enthusiast and loves to paint or go out for a swim. You will usually find her day dreaming about books, plotting stories in her head, blogging away or trying to escape certain death by her stack of unread books.

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The Best Type of Bad Reviews

Some would argue that ‘bad reviews’ or negative reviews have no place in the bookish community and only foster feelings of hurt and hatred and negativity as a whole, but in my opinion they are crucial for both authors and readers.

If written in the right way, negative reviews can be helpful for a number of reasons. The best type of negative reviews would be the ones where the reader doesn’t blindly hate on the story or author but gives constructive criticism and tips for improvement. During the initial stages of sending their story to beta readers, sensitivity readers or giving ARC copies to the very first readers, authors need to sit back with an open mind and thoroughly review the negative feedback they get even if it is rather painful. Many a times the feedback may be about some small things that the author can improve on easily but makes a huge difference to the story all in all. And yes, other times like when the author’s writing style is called  ‘not captivating enough’ that’s not something they can do much about. Their only choice is to learn a lesson from it and research on these weaknesses pointed out by reviewers so that they can work on and avoid them in future.

Negative reviews can be helpful for other readers too; especially if they come from a fellow reviewer they trust. Depending on the things pointed out in these bad reviews a person gets a sense of what the book is about and whether or not they should read it. Because negative reviews don’t deter as many people as you think they would, infact sometimes people read a book because the negative review they read said that the book was slow-paced and heavy on the romance side which was not what the reader was led to believe, but another reader may want exactly that kind of a book.

And lastly, you cannot stop readers from writing these so called bad reviews. They have a right to freedom and speech and can air their thoughts in whichever way they please. So the only option we all really have is to accept and celebrate them.

Charvi Koul

Charvi is an introverted book blogger with a flair for writing and unending love for fictional characters. She is a huge psychology enthusiast and loves to paint or go out for a swim. You will usually find her day dreaming about books, plotting stories in her head, blogging away or trying to escape certain death by her stack of unread books.